Fire and Clay: The Art of Oaxacan Pottery



"This book is an invitation
for all those who wish to know
the threatened and persistent world of Oaxacan pottery,
and an adventure for those who choose to take it.

As enriching as can be, it opens a world to you
and presents a mirror for all your beliefs."

- Gustavo Perez 

Innovando la Tradición fire and clay the art of oaxacan pottery

Texts by Eric Mindling, foreword by Gustavo Perez,
edited and designed by Diego Mier y Terán, photos by Paris Barrera, 
published by Innovando la Tradición and BOM DIA BOA TARDE BOA NOITE.


Fire and Clay: The Art of Oaxacan Pottery approaches pottery from a design perspective, touching on themes such as diversity in form, social contexts, functionality, techniques and the challenges presented by modern times, providing us with the tools to understand pottery and potters in all their complexity.

Innovando la Tradición Fire and Clay the Art of Oaxacan Pottery

Innovando la Tradición Fire and Clay the Art of Oaxacan Pottery

Innovando la Tradición Fire and Clay the Art of Oaxacan Pottery

This book is an homage to the wisdom of potters and a journey into the depths of the ancient trade of pottery. Through beautiful imagery and delightful prose, the book explains the wisdom of artisanal design and pottery’s important economical, social and identity-based roles.

For explorers, there is a detailed guide to visit the 70 pottery villages presented in the book, with maps and directions.

Innovando la Tradición Fire and Clay the Art of Oaxacan Pottery

 

Words and Photos by: BOM DIA BOA TARDE BOA NOITE



PURCHASE YOUR COPY >>

 





Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Meet Our Artisans

Stories on Hemp: Hmong Batik

With no written language, the Hmong people create intricate patterns on Batik textiles, and use them as story-telling devices. 

Stories on Hemp: Hmong Batik

Full article →

The Nankeen Indigo Keepsake
The Nankeen Indigo Keepsake

 

The Nankeen dyeing technique, dating back 3,000 years, is native to China’s Jiangsu province. Known also as Lan Yin Hua Bu (蓝印花布) and Blue Calico, it’s still practiced traditionally today in a handful of small workshops. Using hand-cut paper screens, soybean paste thickened with lime, and natural indigo dye, artisans print contemporary versions of ancient patterns on locally-grown cottons and linens outside the city of Shanghai. 

Full article →

The Legacy of Woodblock Printing
The Legacy of Woodblock Printing


We have been long-time admirers of Indian woodblock printing. The intricate patterns often carry traditional cultural meanings, as well as legacy of the tribes they originally come from. 

 

Full article →