Stories of Weavers from the Real India

 

Injiri means "real India". It is a historic word for "real madras checkered textiles" that were exported to west Africa in the 18th century from the coasts of India. 

Injiri Rebari Home Collection in Organic Cotton

Through her products, the founder and designer of injiri, Chinar Farooqui, expresses her appreciation for the old and the hand-made. The design that one finds in injiri products are mainly the textile designs which are incorporated during the process of weaving by hand. The woven fabric is used in a way that the fabric-making story is conveyed to the end user. 

Injiri works with artisans from various hand loom centers in India

Injiri textiles are designed in various hand loom centers across India, such as West Bengal, Andhra Pradesh, Orissa, Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh. The elegant Rebari home collection uses the Rebari weaving technique in the locally called "Kala cotton", which is grown and hand-spun in Gurajat. Kala cotton is pest and disease proof, and it does not require much water. Farmers never use pesticides or fertilizers on Kala cotton, making it naturally an organic choice.

Injiri Rebari Home Collection in Organic Cotton



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