Hajime Okamoto and the Kabamaru Series

1 Comment

 

Japanese artist Hajime Okamoto was born in Osaka in 1942.  In the 1980s, he went on a cultural exchange program to the Jilin Province of China, and was greatly influenced by his time there.  His works focus on calligraphy, painting and zen concepts.  The most famous Kabamaru Series debuted in 1998. 

Hajime Okamoto: The Kabamaru Tea Cup Set


The Kabamaru series features a group of playful cats, each having their own name and personality. Kabamaru, who gets featured twice in the dish sets, is the leader of the group.  Being a bit of a slow walker, he has a name that means "hippo" (kaba) and "round" (maru) in Japanese.  Momoji is a silly boy with a charming face.  Urume is a laid back tomboy.  Sakon loves to play with all things that move, and he considers Kabamaru to be a brother.  
 
The Kabamaru Dish Set by Hajime Oakamoto



Hajime Okamoto created his whimsical cat characters to the rhythm of jazz. "The beat rhythm of jazz music in the 1960s is really similar to the life of cats, which is slow and free," said the artist.  "This thought made me try to draw cats living slowly in a busy human society, and that became the Kabamaru series."

The Kabamaru Dish Set by Hajime Oakamoto





1 Response

Clara Palazzolo
Clara Palazzolo

August 04, 2017

Ammiro molto il Sig. Okamoto, il calendario 2017 è sicuramente uno dei piu belli!

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Meet Our Artisans

Stories on Hemp: Hmong Batik

With no written language, the Hmong people create intricate patterns on Batik textiles, and use them as story-telling devices. 

Stories on Hemp: Hmong Batik

Full article →

The Nankeen Indigo Keepsake
The Nankeen Indigo Keepsake

 

The Nankeen dyeing technique, dating back 3,000 years, is native to China’s Jiangsu province. Known also as Lan Yin Hua Bu (蓝印花布) and Blue Calico, it’s still practiced traditionally today in a handful of small workshops. Using hand-cut paper screens, soybean paste thickened with lime, and natural indigo dye, artisans print contemporary versions of ancient patterns on locally-grown cottons and linens outside the city of Shanghai. 

Full article →

The Legacy of Woodblock Printing
The Legacy of Woodblock Printing


We have been long-time admirers of Indian woodblock printing. The intricate patterns often carry traditional cultural meanings, as well as legacy of the tribes they originally come from. 

 

Full article →