Behind the Scenes of the Sinkhole Vessels



The Sinkhole Vessels were crafted by the Mateo Family: Dorotea, Alberta, Macrina, Angelina, Elia and Amalia, a group of highly skilled ceramists who inherited ancestral techniques that are deeply embedded in the local culture.
 
Liliana Ovalle, The Sinkhole Vessels
Foam models were documented and sent to the ceramists in Tlapazola, Oaxaca.

 

Liliana Ovalle, The Sinkhole Vessels ​
Bi-dimensional drawing were translated with the aid of measured wooden sticks.

 

Liliana Ovalle, The Sinkhole Vessels ​
Alberta and Dorotea mold the vessels using the 'cone' technique.
The clay is molded on plates balanced on rocks and then spun by hand

 

 ​Liliana Ovalle, The Sinkhole Vessels
Basic tools, such as leather and corn cobs, are used for shaping and spinning the clay.

 

Liliana Ovalle, The Sinkhole Vessels ​
The shape of the vessels is refined while the clay is drying.

 

Liliana Ovalle, The Sinkhole Vessels ​
Once the pieces were dried and fired for a first time,
a second open fire was made to blacken out the vessels.

 

Liliana Ovalle, The Sinkhole Vessels ​
The tones and gradients of each vessel were controlled by
exposing them directly to the flame or the burning ashes.
The 'blackening' process lasts approximately one hour.

 

Liliana Ovalle, The Sinkhole Vessels ​
Each wooden frame was custom made to embrace and support each vessel.

 

Liliana Ovalle, The Sinkhole Vessels ​
Final fitting of the ceramic pieces into the oak frames.

 

 

This content was originally posted on LilianaOvalle.com.
All photos and texts were courtesy of the artist and Colectivo 1050°




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