Liliana Ovalle x Colectivo 1050°: The Sinkhole Vessels

Liliana Ovalle and Colectivo 1050: The Sinkhole Vessels

"This phenomenon ... reveals an underlying space of unknown dimensions." - Liliana Ovalle

Currently on view at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York, the Sinkhole project is the result of a collaboration between London-based artist Liliana Ovalle and Oaxacan ceramist collective Colectivo 1050°.

The black vessels stand as a representation of sinkholes, a portrayal of those voids that emerge abruptly from the ground, dissolving their surroundings into an irretrievable space. Each vessel is suspended in a wooden frame, alluding to a cross section of the ground that reveals the hidden topographies.  

By making reference to different process of extinction, the Sinkhole project aims to reflect and extend the permanence of what seems to be inevitably falling into a void.   

Learn more about the Sinkhole project and the artists behind it in the first issue of our e-journal,  T H E R E

See also  Behind the Scenes of the Sinkhole Vessels

 

 

Originally posted on LilianaOvalle.com.  Photos and texts are courtesy of the artist. 

 

 





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