Recycling Toward A Sustainable Future


In the small village of Cantel, Guatemala, a group of 17 glass artisans joined together in 1976 and opened COPAVIC, the Recycled Glass Cooperative of Cantel. Their vision was clear and simple: Build a sustainable business for both the environment and the people. 

COPAVIC Hand Blowing Glass Guatemala

Discarded beverage bottles and broken glass pieces are melted, tinted, and blown into a variety of new wares, including tumblers, pitchers, vases, and other household items. This process of recyce is completely done by hand. The creation of each new glassware requires at least three artisans working seamlessly together. 

COPAVIC Hand Blowing Glass Guatemala

COPAVIC Hand Blowing Glass Guatemala

COPAVIC Hand Blowing Glass Guatemala


Started from a small loan for basic equipment, the worker-owned cooperative now has 36 artisans in the workshop, providing them and their families with living wages, insurance, education and training. Over the past 40 years, COPAVIC's pursuit of a protected environment and greater economic freedom has never ceased as they continue to transform recycled glass into beautiful glassware.

COPAVIC Hand Blowing Glass Guatemala

Shop glassware made by COPAVIC artisans.

 






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