To Return and Reconnect: Bolé Road Textiles


Ethiopian cotton is praised by some as the new Egyptian cotton. It's soft, fluffy, and a sustainable textile source in copious supply throughout the country. When designer Hana Getachew first returned to Ethiopia after leaving her home country for 18 years as a child, she looked to cotton as the medium of reconnecting with her heritage and sharing its beauty with the world. 



Minzuu Blog: Bolé Road Textiles



The vast land and rich culture in Ethiopia greatly inspired Hana. She named her brand Bolé Road Textiles after the famous street Bolé Road in Addis Ababa, and started working with weaving collectives to bring her design to life. Each of her signature products, she says, "begins with a concept drawn from Ethiopia’s culture and natural beauty". 



Minzuu Blog: Bolé Road Textiles

Minzuu Blog: Bolé Road Textiles

Minzuu Blog: Bolé Road Textiles

Minzuu Blog: Bolé Road Textiles

Minzuu Blog: Bolé Road Textiles

Minzuu Blog: Bolé Road Textiles

Minzuu Blog: Bolé Road Textiles



Hana simplifies the patterns and motifs from traditional Ethiopian textiles, and uses a fresh palette to color her collections. With distinct Ethiopian characteristics, these products add interest and depth to a space; and yet they blend in easily with the rest of the decor, thanks to the perfectly designed proportion of subtlety and fun.  



Minzuu Blog: Bolé Road Textiles

Minzuu Blog: Bolé Road Textiles


Shop our picks from Bolé Road Textiles >



Photos: courtesy of Bolé Road Textiles








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